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CORKI Titanium bicycle fork
2015-07-13 22:44:20

CORKI Titanium bicycle fork
 

A bicycle fork is the part of a bicycle that holds the front wheel.

Forks have several key dimensions which include: offset, length, width, steerer tube length, and steerer tube diameter.

A fork typically consists of two blades which are joined at the top by a fork crown. Above the crown, a steerer tube attaches the fork to the bicycle and the handlebars allowing the user to steer the bicycle. The steerer tube of the fork interfaces with the frame via bearings called a headset mounted in the head tube.

The term fork is sometimes also used to describe the part of a bicycle that holds the rear wheel , which on 19th Century ordinary or penny-farthing bicycles was also a bladed fork. On most modern bicycle designs the rear wheel is now attached to a rear triangle made up of multiple triangulated tubes, rather than an actual fork, but the rear fork usage persists.

Bicycle forks usually have an offset, or rake (not to be confused with a different use of the word rake in the motorcycle world,that places the fork ends forward of the steering axis. This is achieved by curving the blades forward, angling straight blades forward, or by placing the fork ends forward of the centerline of the blades. The latter is used in suspension forks that must have straight blades in order for the suspension mechanism to work. Curved fork blades can also provide some shock absorption.

Suspension fork design has advanced in recent years with suspension forks becoming increasingly sophisticated and diverse in design. The amount of suspension travel available has increased over time. When suspension forks were introduced, 80–100 mm of travel was deemed sufficient for a downhill mountain bike. Typically this amount of travel is now used in XC disciplines, with downhill forks now offering 150 to 200 mm of travel for handling extreme terrain.

 

Other advances in design include adjustable travel allowing riders to adapt the fork's travel to the specific terrain profile. Typically, less suspension travel is needed for uphill or flat terrain than for downhill terrain. Advanced designs also often feature the ability to lock out the fork to eliminate or drastically reduce the fork's travel for more efficient riding over smooth sections of terrain. This lockout can sometimes be activated remotely by a cable and lever on the handlebars.


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